There are several ways to set up a livestream from a Teradek Cube — all of which can be used at the same time as C2C proxies. Each solution serves a slightly different use case and each have different levels of technical requirements, ranging from “plug and play” to much more involved.

In this article, we’ll explore four streaming solutions as well as Teradek’s CORE platform.

Video Chat

This method involves connecting the production camera to a laptop and using it as a webcam in a video chat on a platform like Zoom or Microsoft Teams. It is inexpensive, easy to set up, and has low latency. It also requires no additional set up on the Teradek Cube. However, there is less control over the quality of the image as video chat platforms optimize their streams for latency over quality.

Requirements

For this method, you will need the following (in addition to the basic C2C requirements):

  • AJA U-Tap SDI

  • Computer with USB3 port

  • Zoom or Microsoft Teams account and meeting

Most computer-connected capture devices will work (and there are other small, inexpensive video capture devices like the Blackmagic UltraStudio Recorder 3G), but in this set up we are using the AJA U-Tap SDI because it has a video loop-out. This loop-out eliminates the need for an additional distribution amplifier.

Setup

A video chat livestream is fairly straightforward to set up and, again, does not require any additional configuration on the Teradek Cube itself. Instead, we will route the video signal from the camera into the U-Tap and then into the Teradek Cube.

  1. First, you will need to connect the U-Tap and set it up on your computer. Refer to AJA’s instructions for installation.

  2. Connect the camera’s SDI output to the AJA U-Tap SDI In with an SDI cable.

  3. Connect the U-Tap’s SDI Out to the Teradek Cube SDI In with an SDI cable.

Once connected, all we need to do is set up the video chat platform to use the U-Tap as the webcam. Here, we’ll go over the two most common platforms: Zoom and Microsoft Teams.

Setting up Zoom

  1. Open the Zoom app and go to Preferences.

  2. From the sidebar, select Video.

  3. Where it says Camera, open the dropdown and select the AJA U-Tap as your device. This usually defaults to the built-in webcam on the computer.

Choosing a different camera in Zoom

This can also be done once in a meeting from the video options menu.

Setting up Microsoft Teams

1. Open the Teams app and go to Preferences.

2. From the sidebar, select Devices.

3. Scroll down to the bottom of the page. Where it says Camera, open the dropdown and select the AJA U-Tap as your device. This usually defaults to the built-in webcam on the computer.

Choosing a different camera in Microsoft Teams

This can also be done while joining a meeting (by clicking on the gear icon under the video preview) or once in the meeting by clicking on the options menu (three dots in the upper right) and selecting Device Settings.

Accessing Device Settings in Microsoft Teams during a call with the three dot menu

The camera feed will now display in the video chat as a user. From here, you can pin the video and control the audio settings depending on the shooting environment.

YouTube Live

Streaming to a YouTube Live event is easy to setup, high quality, and doesn’t require any extra hardware. All that’s required is a YouTube account. However, streaming to YouTube does have high latency, so it might not be best for use cases where recipients need to be directly engaged with the camera feed. Additionally, while you can set up the YouTube Live event to be either unlisted or private, this method is less secure than others in this article.

Requirements

For this method, you will need the following (in addition to the basic C2C requirements):

  • YouTube account

  • Access to the Teradek Cube’s WebUI

Setup

To setup a YouTube stream, we will first pair the Teradek to the YouTube account, create the event, then start the stream. This involves configuration both on YouTube and on the Teradek Cube itself.

1. First, YouTube streaming needs to be enabled on the Cube. In the Cube’s WebUI, navigate to Video Stream Output.

2. Change the Mode to Internet Streaming, then change the Provider to YouTubeLive. Click Apply to save the settings.

3. Now that YouTube is enabled on the Cube, it needs to be authorized to your YouTube account. Click Authorize Your Device. This will bring up a window with an authorization code and a URL. Follow the instructions in the window:

  1. Copy the provided code

  2. Follow the URL (https://www.google.com/device)

4. Paste the code in the Enter Code box on Google’s website and click Next.

5. Confirm which signed-in YouTube account you would like to authorize the device to.

6. Confirm the device’s access by selecting Allow. The Cube is now authorized to the YouTube account.

7. Return to the Cube’s WebUI and click Continue

8. The Cube will show a list of events that exist in the YouTube account. You can select an existing one or create a new one by clicking Create New Live Event.

The Teradek Cube is now setup to stream to YouTube. To change which event the Cube streams to, click on the name of the event under Broadcast Name. The Cube will be able to access any valid event attached to the YouTube account. If you would like to create a new event to stream to, you can do that using the methods below.

To begin the stream, click Go Live under the preview thumbnail in the Cube’s WebUI. You can also start the stream by clicking the red button on the front of the Cube.

To stop the stream, you can either click Complete or Stop in the Cube’s WebUI. Complete will both stop streaming and close the event. Stop will stop streaming, but you will be able to resume the stream later. You can also stop the stream by clicking the red button on the front of the Cube.

Creating a New Live Event on YouTube

Creating a new YouTube Live event on YouTube provides deep customization and configuration options.

1. Log in to your YouTube account, select the Create button in the upper right hand corner, and click Go live.

Selecting Go live under the Create button on YouTube

2. This will create a new event with default settings. Click Edit to begin configuring the event.

3. Enter the title and description and set the visibility level.

Note: Public events can be searched for an viewable by anyone on YouTube; Unlisted events are only viewable by those with the URL; Private events are only viewable by people who have been invited by email.

4. Add a thumbnail if desired (this will display when the stream is not actively live) and set other optional settings.

5. YouTube does require you to confirm whether the video content is intended for children or not. In most cases, you should select No, it’s not made for kids. This will ensure the video (if public) will not be indexed by YouTube Kids. Selecting this setting does not mark your video as explicit, unless you also set Age Restrictions below it.

6. When done, click Save.

7. Return to Video Stream Output in the Cube’s WebUI.

8. Click on the currently selected stream under Broadcast Name and select the new event.

Creating a New Live Event on the Cube

Alternatively, a YouTube Live event can be created from the Cube itself once it’s been authorized to the account.

1. In the Cube WebUI, navigate to Video Stream Output.

2. Click the currently selected event to edit it.

3. In the event selection screen, click Create New Live Event.

4. Enter in the title, description, and start time. Make sure you select the correct privacy level for the event (if necessary, this can be changed from YouTube later).

Note: Public events can be searched for an viewable by anyone on YouTube; Unlisted events are only viewable by those with the URL; Private events are only viewable by people who have been invited by email.

5. Click Create. The new event should now be created and listed in the events list. Click the new event to select it.

Wowza

Streaming to Wowza is high quality, doesn’t require any extra hardware, and allows for secure, custom viewing experiences. However, like YouTube, streaming to Wowza does have high latency, so it might not be best for use cases where recipients need to be directly engaged with the camera feed. Additionally, Wowza is built for custom stream distribution so the setup is slightly more technical than YouTube — but it allows you to fully control (and therefore secure) the viewing experience.

For this guide, we will be using Wowza Streaming Cloud, but the Cube can also stream using Wowza Streaming Engine. Refer to Wowza’s website for more information on Wowza Streaming Engine.

Requirements

For this method, you will need the following (in addition to the basic C2C requirements):

  • Wowza Streaming Cloud account

  • Access to the Teradek Cube’s WebUI

Setup

To setup a stream to Wowza, we will first create the event on Wowza Streaming Cloud, connect the Teradek Cube to the event, then start the stream. This involves configuration on both Wowza and on the Teradek Cube itself.

1. First, Wowza streaming needs to be enabled on the Cube. In the Cube’s WebUI, navigate to Video Stream Output.

2. Change the Mode to Internet Streaming, then change the Provider to Wowza. Click Apply to save the settings.

3. Next, we will need to select the Mode. In this guide, we will be using Wowza Streaming Cloud, so make sure Mode is set to Cloud.

4. Login to your Wowza Streaming Cloud account (cloud.wowza.com)

5. Logging in will take you to your management homepage. From there, select + Add Live Stream from the top navigation bar.

Add a new stream from the Wowza Streaming Cloud toolbar

6. This will start Wowza’s guided setup. First, give the stream a name and select the region (this should be closest to where the stream is originating). Click Next.

7. This will take you to the next step in Wowza’s guided setup. In this step, Wowza needs to know what device the stream is coming from. In the list, find Teradek and select it.

8. The second part of this step in the guided setup lists several options to configure. Many of these will vary based on preference, but for our purposes, there are two that should have specific settings. What type of live stream is this?should be set to Passthrough and Aspect Ratio should be set to 1920 x 1080 (1080p). The rest of the settings are optional for this guide. When done, click Next.

Set the aspect ratio of a Wowza stream to 1920x1080 (1080p)


Note: Some account types do not support Pay-As-You-Go Passthrough streaming. If yours does not, select Adaptive Bitrate.

9. In this step, you can customize how the player will appear to a viewer. These settings are entirely optional for this guide. When done, click Next.

10. In this step, you can choose whether you want Wowza to host the player. These settings, like the previous step, are entirely optional for this guide. When done, click Next.

Note: If you’re testing Wowza, then you it may be easier to configure Wowza to host the player page and give it a title and description. This will host it on a public URL. If you choose not to have Wowza host the player, you can access the player through a client app (like VLC Player) or host the player on your own page where you can control the security. Once the event is created, Wowza will provide the information for accessing and hosting the stream.

11. The final step will ask you to review all the configured settings for the stream. Once you’ve reviewed them and they look correct, click Finish.

12. Clicking Finish will take you to the new stream’s management page. Before we can begin the stream, we need to connect the Cube to the event. On the main page, look for the Connection Code and copy it.

Copy the 6 character connection code from the Wowza stream management page

13. Return to Video Stream Output on the Cube WebUI. Paste the code you copied from the previous step into the Connection Code box in the Cube WebUI. Click Apply. This will connect the Cube to the Wowza event.

14. The Teradek Cube is now ready to stream to the Wowza event. To begin streaming, we need to start the stream on Wowza first. Return to the event’s management page and select Start Live Stream. This will activate the stream.

Use the green Start Live Stream button to activate the stream on Wowza

15. Next we need to start streaming on the Cube. Return to the Cube WebUI and starting streaming by clicking the Livebutton (depicted as a radio antenna) under the preview thumbnail in the Cube’s WebUI. You can also start the stream by clicking the red button on the front of the Cube.

Click the green radio antenna button on the Cube WebUI to start the stream on the Cube

To stop the stream, you will need to click the Live button on the Cube WebUI (or click the red button on the front of the Cube) and select Stop Live Stream from the Wowza event management page.

Custom RTMP Server

While platforms like Wowza provide RTMP servers and management all in one package, the Cube can also stream to custom RTMP servers and setting it up is fairly straightforward. This solution is good if you already have an existing streaming server infrastructure and you’d like the Cube to tap into it.

Requirements

For this method, you will need the following (in addition to the basic C2C requirements):

  • An existing RTMP server

  • URL for the RTMP server

  • An existing stream on the RTMP server

  • Access to the Teradek Cube’s WebUI

Setup

To setup the RTMP stream, we will enter the RTMP server’s information into the Cube and then begin the stream. Since custom RTMP solutions can vary greatly, we will only cover how to connect the Cube to an existing server and stream. If you are interested in setting up an RTMP solution quickly, we recommend you look at the Wowza solution earlier in this guide.

1. First, RTMP streaming needs to be enabled on the Cube. In the Cube’s WebUI, navigate to Video Stream Output.

2. Change the Mode to RTMP/RTMPS, then click Apply to save the settings.

3. Enter the URL for your RTMP server under RTMP/RTMPS Server URL.

4. Enter the name of the stream on the server you are sending video to under Stream.

5. Click Apply to save the settings.

6. Finally, we need to start streaming on the Cube. Start streaming by clicking the Live button (depicted as a radio antenna) under the preview thumbnail in the Cube’s WebUI. You can also start the stream by clicking the red button on the front of the Cube.

Click the green radio antenna button on the Cube WebUI to start the stream on the Cube

To stop the stream, you will need to click the Live button on the Cube WebUI (or click the red button on the front of the Cube).

Teradek CORE

Teradek has their own cloud streaming and proxy platform called CORE. You can view streams in CORE or use CORE to redistribute streams to other platforms. CORE is easy to connect to, secure, and offers a lot of features. Teradek has a wealth of information about the platform on their website.

Requirements

For this method, you will need the following (in addition to the basic C2C requirements):

  • A Teradek Core Cloud account

  • Access to the Teradek Cube’s WebUI

Setup

Teradek CORE manages the Cube from the Dashboard on the CORE website. However, before you can do that, you need to authorize your Cube to your CORE account. This guide will illustrate how to connect the Cube to your CORE account.

1. Navigate to Cloud Services on the Cube’s WebUI.

2. Make sure Cloud Service is set to Core instead of None. Click Apply to save.

3. Now that CORE is enabled on the Cube, you can connect the device to the account. You can either click Authorize Device or log in directly on the Cube.

4. Once the Cube is connected to the account, you can choose which stream to attach it to under Advanced Options.

To start the stream, you will need to click the Go Live button on the Cube WebUI (or click the red button on the front of the Cube).

Teradek has several guides covering setup and configuration for streaming available on their support site. Follow the links below for more information:

Using Other Hardware Encoders

While the Teradek Cube is a hardware video encoder, your existing infrastructure may already utilize other streaming hardware. The Teradek Cube can work within an existing signal flow and streaming infrastructure if needed. You can send an SDI signal to the Teradek Cube for Frame.io C2C and another SDI signal to your streaming infrastructure.

Requirements

For this method, you will need the following (in addition to the basic C2C requirements):

  • Camera with multiple SDI outputs, or

  • Distribution amplifier

The Teradek Cube is what we call a “terminal device,” meaning there is no SDI output — only an SDI input. So if you don’t have an extra SDI output on the camera to go to your streaming hardware, you can use a distribution amplifier instead. A distribution amplifier (or DA) is a device that can take an SDI video signal and split it in two. This will allow you to take the output from the camera and split the signal so one can go to the Teradek Cube and one can go to the streaming hardware.

This requires no additional setup other than building out the video signal flow using one of the two methods above. In this case, the Cube operates completely independently from any existing streaming hardware. However, the reason why we recommend using either a DA or a discrete output from the camera is because some devices that have an SDI output may remove metadata and information from the SDI signal that’s necessary for C2C — like record flags, clipname, or timecode. This is why the Teradek Cube should receive its own, clean signal if possible.

Other Solutions

The Teradek Cube supports many other streaming protocols including SRT and HLS. These are just as compatible with C2C as the solutions presented in this guide, but are, today, much more specialized. For these solutions, you’ll need the correct credentials from the server and/or your respective infrastructure to enter into the Cube’s WebUI. These are all configurable from the Video Stream Output tab on the Cube WebUI. For more information on setting these solutions up, you should refer to the Teradek Cube Reference Guide.

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